Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians.

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Posts tagged with ‘girls get busy’

ZINE SUBMISSION CALL: If you’d like to contribute any art / words / photos / drawings / whatever to Girls Get Busy #22, please email your submissions to girlsgetbusyzine@gmail.com
DEADLINE: 15TH JULY 2014
From now on all future GGB issues will be in full colour, so please bare that in mind when submitting ☺ Black and white submissions are still accepted 
Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians. You can read Girls Get Busy zines for free at issuu.com/ggbzine

ZINE SUBMISSION CALL: If you’d like to contribute any art / words / photos / drawings / whatever to Girls Get Busy #22, please email your submissions to girlsgetbusyzine@gmail.com

DEADLINE: 15TH JULY 2014

From now on all future GGB issues will be in full colour, so please bare that in mind when submitting ☺ Black and white submissions are still accepted 

Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians. You can read Girls Get Busy zines for free at issuu.com/ggbzine

(Source: girlsgetbusyzine)

A really lovely review of Girls Get Busy #21 up on The Le Sigh website:


The pictures, even, are images we frequently encounter in our daily lives—a bra on the bed, or an apathetic glance in a grocery store. Even the stylized paintings are of scenes we come across often, though perhaps without thought, and in a much more beautiful way then we might initially imagine as we experience them. It’s even difficult to differentiate between the fiction and nonfiction pieces, as the emotions conveyed through each story feel so intimate, so real, so plausible.I have lived in my body for all these years but still I need maps and torches and compasses to know who I am what I want where I’m going 

Read the full piece HERE

A really lovely review of Girls Get Busy #21 up on The Le Sigh website:

The pictures, even, are images we frequently encounter in our daily lives—a bra on the bed, or an apathetic glance in a grocery store. Even the stylized paintings are of scenes we come across often, though perhaps without thought, and in a much more beautiful way then we might initially imagine as we experience them. It’s even difficult to differentiate between the fiction and nonfiction pieces, as the emotions conveyed through each story feel so intimate, so real, so plausible.

I have lived in my body 
for all these years 
but still I need 
maps and torches and compasses to know 
who I am 
what I want 
where I’m going


Read the full piece HERE

Just want to thank everyone who came to the Cyberfeminism and the Digital Diaspora talk, part of the NEW Gen NOW events series at The White Building!
I was extremely nervous as it was my first time doing this kind of thing but proud of myself for going out of my comfort zone and just hope people enjoyed it.
- Beth
Above photo taken by Rachel Falconer of Beth showing the trans experience computer game Dys4ia

Just want to thank everyone who came to the Cyberfeminism and the Digital Diaspora talk, part of the NEW Gen NOW events series at The White Building!

I was extremely nervous as it was my first time doing this kind of thing but proud of myself for going out of my comfort zone and just hope people enjoyed it.

- Beth

Above photo taken by Rachel Falconer of Beth showing the trans experience computer game Dys4ia

(Source: girlsgetbusyzine)

Girls Get Busy Mixtape: I’m quitting my job
You know when it’s time
Featuring: Kelis / MIA / King Avriel / Beyonce / Lykke Li / Kelela + more
Listen at 8tracks.com/girlsgetbusyzine/i-m-quitting-my-job
Mix by HadeelArtwork source: Buffy

Girls Get Busy Mixtape: I’m quitting my job

You know when it’s time

Featuring: Kelis / MIA / King Avriel / Beyonce / Lykke Li / Kelela + more

Listen at 8tracks.com/girlsgetbusyzine/i-m-quitting-my-job

Mix by Hadeel
Artwork source: Buffy

Girls Get Busy #21 is finally finished and available for free online HERE
NOW IN COLOUR
Featuring: Patricia Alvarado, Hiba Argane, Darcie Blake, Naana Bodomo, Leslie Boroczk, Cristine Brache, Alyse Burnside, Katrina Cervoni, Samantha Conlon, Sammie Concilio, Zie Darling, Erin Dorney, Nora Drew, Azia Egbe, Malu Engel, Femtyechrome, Cecilia Ferraro, Georgia Grace Gibson, Dafy Hagai, S. Nicole Lane, Daisy Lafarge, Gena LeBlanc, Sonia Lopez, Laura Maw, Alanna McArdle, Katherine McBride, Rivers Henry McKenzie, Claire Milbrath, Beth Milner, Szilvia Molnar, Madeleine Moriarty, Jo Pink, Christina Poku, Livia Roscioli, Beth Siveyer, Cheyenne Sophia, Pamela Loredo Sustaita, Barbora Togel, Katerina P. Trichia, Ebonni Watford
Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians. Curated by Beth Siveyer
Cover artwork by Patricia Alvarado

Girls Get Busy #21 is finally finished and available for free online HERE

NOW IN COLOUR

Featuring: Patricia Alvarado, Hiba Argane, Darcie Blake, Naana Bodomo, Leslie Boroczk, Cristine Brache, Alyse Burnside, Katrina Cervoni, Samantha Conlon, Sammie Concilio, Zie Darling, Erin Dorney, Nora Drew, Azia Egbe, Malu Engel, Femtyechrome, Cecilia Ferraro, Georgia Grace Gibson, Dafy Hagai, S. Nicole Lane, Daisy Lafarge, Gena LeBlanc, Sonia Lopez, Laura Maw, Alanna McArdle, Katherine McBride, Rivers Henry McKenzie, Claire Milbrath, Beth Milner, Szilvia Molnar, Madeleine Moriarty, Jo Pink, Christina Poku, Livia Roscioli, Beth Siveyer, Cheyenne Sophia, Pamela Loredo Sustaita, Barbora Togel, Katerina P. Trichia, Ebonni Watford

Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians. Curated by Beth Siveyer

Cover artwork by Patricia Alvarado

Girls Get Busy Interview: Arm Candy

image

Sarah interviews Kate Meizner from the band, Arm Candy about musicianship, being a girl in band and the Brooklyn music scene. Kate mentions a ton of bands in the meanwhile, so go forth and follow the links!

Hi, Kate, you’re in the band Arm Candy. Can you tell me a little about how you found your bandmates/formed the band?

A friend of mine from the internet (very millennial) introduced me to Carey (drummer of Arm Candy) at a show in early 2013. I was playing in an indie pop band at the time and was looking for a heavier project, so when Carey mentioned that Arm Candy needed a bassist, I was really jazzed about playing with them. The first demo, which isn’t online anymore, definitely had some ill riffs I could get down with. Emails were exchanged, and I had my first practice with Carey and Nathan where we jammed a few songs and hung out with Carey’s cool dog. Very good vibes. We started practicing every week and I was thrilled to just hang out and write songs, which I hadn’t done a lot of in my other band.

What kind of previous band experiences did you have? How long has this been part of your life?

I’ve been playing guitar since I was 14 - before that I played clarinet and totally sucked at it, so my dad went and exchanged it for a Peavey. Around the same time, I was getting into a bunch of ‘turn of the century’ early 00s pop punk and older punk like X and Black Flag. I remember listening to The Ramones and thinking ‘hey this song is only three notes…I can do this,’ so one night I stole my dad’s guitar and taught myself some chords. Then, when my 9th grade English teacher assigned a project to create a piece of art about a book we were reading, I chose it as an opportunity to write an alarmingly depressing and terrible pop song, which I played on an unamplified electric guitar in front of my class. I recall having a huge zit on my forehead.

I have a really weird band CV ranging from punk/pop punk to like…prog rock. In Western Mass I was in hardcore punk band called Honeysuck with Ally Einbinder (now the bassist in Potty Mouth) Sam Chaplin, and Marc Candilore (Tampered Reels). We put out a tape called All Your Lipsticks Are Bombs to Us where I’m playing guitar. I was in that band until I relocated to New York in 2011.

Most recently, I played in a jangly indie pop band called Gondola. I finished recording an album with them in December, and we released a four track 7” last March.

Read More

(Source: girlsgetbusyzine)

Girls Get Busy Review - Madelyn Villano
written by Millie Minou
Madelyn Villano is a Portland-based multi-instrumentalist musician who records under several different monikers including Guzo and Giggles. At just 24 years old, she has managed to cultivate an impressive discography already.
Villano has been a member of the influential experimental noise group, Smegma, since 2011 in which she plays violin and electronics. For those who don’t know Smegma (I tried to start this sentence, like, 9 different ways because I get it, but I mean the band!!!) – besides having the best name ever – they are one of the few music collectives still performing and recording from the Los Angeles Free Music Society movement of the 1970s. They have collaborated with many of experimental music’s greats including Merzbow, Wolf Eyes, Non, and John Wiese. It seems unlikely that such a young person would be accepted into as venerated a group as Smegma but Villano’s presence in the band makes total sense: she is incredibly talented. Her available solo work is mostly comprised of hypnotic, ambient soundscapes. Sometimes building up from one pulsing loop, sometimes distorted, sometimes interwoven with ethereal, minimal house-y rhythms, every track I’ve heard of hers is great.
Villano’s music is lush and intricate with moments of heart-tugging, deep, dissonant swells or 30-second excerpts where you’re just like, “fuck, that sounds so cool!!!” There is even some dreamy piano composition happening in the latter portion of the second tape up on her soundcloud (link below). Beyond her obvious musical abilities, Villano is also active in the DIY community of Portland and has contributed to events such as Portland’s Females of Color Fest, which means she is likely, a Good Human whom you should have no qualms supporting. She is currently taking a brief hiatus from independent projects in order to finish up college with a degree in music (focusing her studies in ethnomusicology) but is planning on organizing a new tape soon. For now, check out everything the internet has to offer of her work (especially the last link where you can purchase tapes from Pigface Records including her debut, American Girl, and other projects with which she’s been involved):
Madelyn Villano - Guitar + Distortion
Giggles - Stress. Without You. Forgiving.
soundcloud.com/guzotapes
Pigface Records

Girls Get Busy Review - Madelyn Villano

written by Millie Minou

Madelyn Villano is a Portland-based multi-instrumentalist musician who records under several different monikers including Guzo and Giggles. At just 24 years old, she has managed to cultivate an impressive discography already.

Villano has been a member of the influential experimental noise group, Smegma, since 2011 in which she plays violin and electronics. For those who don’t know Smegma (I tried to start this sentence, like, 9 different ways because I get it, but I mean the band!!!) – besides having the best name ever – they are one of the few music collectives still performing and recording from the Los Angeles Free Music Society movement of the 1970s. They have collaborated with many of experimental music’s greats including Merzbow, Wolf Eyes, Non, and John Wiese. It seems unlikely that such a young person would be accepted into as venerated a group as Smegma but Villano’s presence in the band makes total sense: she is incredibly talented. Her available solo work is mostly comprised of hypnotic, ambient soundscapes. Sometimes building up from one pulsing loop, sometimes distorted, sometimes interwoven with ethereal, minimal house-y rhythms, every track I’ve heard of hers is great.

Villano’s music is lush and intricate with moments of heart-tugging, deep, dissonant swells or 30-second excerpts where you’re just like, “fuck, that sounds so cool!!!” There is even some dreamy piano composition happening in the latter portion of the second tape up on her soundcloud (link below). Beyond her obvious musical abilities, Villano is also active in the DIY community of Portland and has contributed to events such as Portland’s Females of Color Fest, which means she is likely, a Good Human whom you should have no qualms supporting. She is currently taking a brief hiatus from independent projects in order to finish up college with a degree in music (focusing her studies in ethnomusicology) but is planning on organizing a new tape soon. For now, check out everything the internet has to offer of her work (especially the last link where you can purchase tapes from Pigface Records including her debut, American Girl, and other projects with which she’s been involved):

Madelyn Villano - Guitar + Distortion

Giggles - Stress. Without You. Forgiving.

soundcloud.com/guzotapes

Pigface Records

(Source: girlsgetbusyzine)

Girls Get Busy Mixtape: Redheads
Just a ruse to bring an incredible bunch of different women from weird a combination of genres together
Featuring: Garbage / Neko Case / Florence and the Machine / Karen Elson /  Jenny Lewis / Rilo Kiley / Judy Garland
Listen here: 8tracks.com/girlsgetbusyzine/redheads
Mix + Artwork by Hadeel

Girls Get Busy Mixtape: Redheads

Just a ruse to bring an incredible bunch of different women from weird a combination of genres together

Featuring: Garbage / Neko Case / Florence and the Machine / Karen Elson /  Jenny Lewis / Rilo Kiley / Judy Garland

Listen here: 8tracks.com/girlsgetbusyzine/redheads

Mix + Artwork by Hadeel

Girls Get Busy Review: All Dogs - 7”
Written by Sarah
I put on All Dogs while tidying my bedroom, absently sweeping up the tumbleweeds of dog hair and throwing out expired bus passes for a few minutes before I realized I was doing more dancing than cleaning. Something about the band made me think, “I should re-watch Josie and the Pussycats” in the best possible way. Maryn Jones, leader singer and guitarist, has a voice that articulates the anxiety of the pop-punk 20-something by hanging on vowels until her voice nearly breaks. On Buddy when she sings, “I just don’t see you anymore/Don’t have the time/Well if you ever need me/Know where to find me/I’ll be the one you can call if you need something different,” I heard my own sincere feelings towards friends far away or too busy.
Hailing from Columbus, Ohio, All Dogs released their first 7” in last November though Salinas Records, and prior to that had self-released a split tape with Slouch. Something in the casual drumming and longing vocals recalls a more upbeat Where You Been-era Dinosaur Jr., without the overearnest masculine whining* especially on Say, “You were waiting for me,” Jones cries, “I still have something to saaaaaaaaaaay….”. The whole thing feels very sad-on-a-hot-summer day, melancholic but relaxed and willing to accept what comes next. The melancholy is neither trite nor ironic, and it’s an understandable ethos that would pair well with Waxahatchee (Katie Crutchfield), who the band opened for on the East Coast leg of her tour in January . The positive reception they received as openers sparked press at Pitchfork and a grating “told-you-so” piece from Stereogum, and since then their profile has picked up considerably. Jones also records under her own name and with the band Saintseneca.
You can hear the genuine enthusiasm behind Jesse Withers’ drumming and bassist Amanda Bartley grounds songs that would otherwise be slightly too discordant to be tender, building emotional tension especially on confessional tracks like Love Song, when Jones’ spits “I’ll fuck it up! Just wait and see!” but neither instrument ever overpowers Jones’ clearly enunciated confessions and apologies. I love the unpolished nature of All Dogs tracks, the way each song seems about getting the song OUT rather than posturing musically. The trio is talented enough to have left any shoulder-chips behind and the result is a cheerfully sad style. With only a handful of tracks out, it might be best to keep an eye on this band by following their Tumblr.
*I sincerely love Dinosaur Jr., please understand that we have to be honest about things we love.
alldogs.bandcamp.com

Girls Get Busy Review: All Dogs - 7”

Written by Sarah

I put on All Dogs while tidying my bedroom, absently sweeping up the tumbleweeds of dog hair and throwing out expired bus passes for a few minutes before I realized I was doing more dancing than cleaning. Something about the band made me think, “I should re-watch Josie and the Pussycats” in the best possible way. Maryn Jones, leader singer and guitarist, has a voice that articulates the anxiety of the pop-punk 20-something by hanging on vowels until her voice nearly breaks. On Buddy when she sings, “I just don’t see you anymore/Don’t have the time/Well if you ever need me/Know where to find me/I’ll be the one you can call if you need something different,” I heard my own sincere feelings towards friends far away or too busy.

Hailing from Columbus, Ohio, All Dogs released their first 7” in last November though Salinas Records, and prior to that had self-released a split tape with Slouch. Something in the casual drumming and longing vocals recalls a more upbeat Where You Been-era Dinosaur Jr., without the overearnest masculine whining* especially on Say, “You were waiting for me,” Jones cries, “I still have something to saaaaaaaaaaay….”. The whole thing feels very sad-on-a-hot-summer day, melancholic but relaxed and willing to accept what comes next. The melancholy is neither trite nor ironic, and it’s an understandable ethos that would pair well with Waxahatchee (Katie Crutchfield), who the band opened for on the East Coast leg of her tour in January . The positive reception they received as openers sparked press at Pitchfork and a grating “told-you-so” piece from Stereogum, and since then their profile has picked up considerably. Jones also records under her own name and with the band Saintseneca.

You can hear the genuine enthusiasm behind Jesse Withers’ drumming and bassist Amanda Bartley grounds songs that would otherwise be slightly too discordant to be tender, building emotional tension especially on confessional tracks like Love Song, when Jones’ spits “I’ll fuck it up! Just wait and see!” but neither instrument ever overpowers Jones’ clearly enunciated confessions and apologies. I love the unpolished nature of All Dogs tracks, the way each song seems about getting the song OUT rather than posturing musically. The trio is talented enough to have left any shoulder-chips behind and the result is a cheerfully sad style. With only a handful of tracks out, it might be best to keep an eye on this band by following their Tumblr.

*I sincerely love Dinosaur Jr., please understand that we have to be honest about things we love.

alldogs.bandcamp.com

(Source: girlsgetbusyzine)