Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians.

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I often hear black girls complain that their hair is difficult to control, and it’s precisely because we are not meant to control it.

I have always found that jeans hurt my body with waistlines digging into my stomach as I try to exhale.

T shirts that cut into my arms, bras that dig into my flesh leaving scars that remain today.

We were not the architects of this system, of course these things won’t fit us when they come from people who refuse to acknowledge that we exist. We know this because we see their runways, their print ads, their magazines. We are not wrong.

Beige is not the definition of ‘nude’, my hair does not need to be restrained, it needs to be liberated. My hair isn’t so thick, I didn’t go through puberty too early, my mama is not ‘plus sized’ - these statement all use an invented standard of whiteness and then define me in relation to that standard.

Fuck mainstream. Fuck counter culture and sub culture. We are our own mainstream. We are our own culture.

Fuck standards and constructions of normal. Nothing ever grew by being measured. We grow by being nurtured and affirmed for who we are as we are. Standards are always relative.

-Kim Katrin Crosby

(Source: elotrosoyyo, via thewitchwife)

tenderblog:

tender three now online
escapistthemesofpurity:
"People want homophobia to change in black America the way that homophobia changed in white America, but it’s not going to happen that way. It’s gonna happen in a way that is befitting to black culture. Everyone always knew Little Richard was gay, but because of his talent, people overlooked it. Dennis Rodman is heterosexual but was a public cross-dresser, but because he was such a good NBA player, people overlooked it. In black culture, talent has always been this big deal. In black culture, there is an ideology of support, of taking care of your people and your community. Changing homophobia is going to come from public figures and pastors telling their community to love their children, that lesbians and gays are your brothers and sisters, that you can be gay and that doesn’t make you less of a strong black man. Discrimination, segregation, and racism make people feel that they have to be strong. And people relate strength to masculinity. And people relate homosexuality to being the opposite of masculinity. When femininity is seen as a source of power in black culture, homophobia will no longer exist."- Mykki Blanco in this interview with Bullet

escapistthemesofpurity:

"People want homophobia to change in black America the way that homophobia changed in white America, but it’s not going to happen that way. It’s gonna happen in a way that is befitting to black culture. Everyone always knew Little Richard was gay, but because of his talent, people overlooked it. Dennis Rodman is heterosexual but was a public cross-dresser, but because he was such a good NBA player, people overlooked it. In black culture, talent has always been this big deal. In black culture, there is an ideology of support, of taking care of your people and your community. Changing homophobia is going to come from public figures and pastors telling their community to love their children, that lesbians and gays are your brothers and sisters, that you can be gay and that doesn’t make you less of a strong black man. Discrimination, segregation, and racism make people feel that they have to be strong. And people relate strength to masculinity. And people relate homosexuality to being the opposite of masculinity. When femininity is seen as a source of power in black culture, homophobia will no longer exist."

- Mykki Blanco in this interview with Bullet

(via bitchtrials)

Just appearing as a woman online, it seems, can be enough to inspire abuse. In 2006, researchers from the University of Maryland set up a bunch of fake online accounts and then dispatched them into chat rooms. Accounts with feminine usernames incurred an average of 100 sexually explicit or threatening messages a day. Masculine names received 3.7.

ojo-de-venado:

Googoosh by Afsoon

 Afsoon is an Iranian artist. After spending her childhood in Iran and late teens and early twenties in San Francisco, she settled in London. Her nomadic life is reflected in her work where East merges with West and the result is at once familiar and foreign. There are several layers in Afsoon’s work and at times she combines text with images. She also combines diverse technics such as linocuts, photography, mixed-media and etching. The result is a rich yet often playful and humorous pictures in which the audience is able to enjoy in its own way. - Source

(via dancingwithdiversity)

oomkzine:

OOMK Zine are hosting Kilburn Comic and Zine Fair in South Kilburn Studios on Saturday 15th February, with talks, workshops and zines for sale.
https://www.facebook.com/events/657152920997461/
Stalls: If you make or distro zines/comics/artists’ books and would like table space please email oomkzine@gmail.com asap with the following info Name/Distro:Price range: Swaps (yes/no): Weblink (if you have one):We’re also looking for people to do talks and workshops so if you’ve got skillz please get in touch. Tables are first come first served so book soon! 

oomkzine:

OOMK Zine are hosting Kilburn Comic and Zine Fair in South Kilburn Studios on Saturday 15th February, with talks, workshops and zines for sale.

https://www.facebook.com/events/657152920997461/

Stalls: If you make or distro zines/comics/artists’ books and would like table space please email oomkzine@gmail.com asap with the following info 

Name/Distro:
Price range: 
Swaps (yes/no): 
Weblink (if you have one):

We’re also looking for people to do talks and workshops so if you’ve got skillz please get in touch. Tables are first come first served so book soon! 

As a transgender person it’s shocking to find out how many people in the press are willing to euphemistically or directly try to talk about your anatomy, in a way that you never would another person, in this really degrading way.

— Antony Hegarty (via sirrealism)

(Source: independent.co.uk, via whitegirlswithbindis)

mariapizzeria:

ARVIDAMARIA for i love fake magazine

I spot a Girls Get Busy necklace :)

mariapizzeria:

ARVIDAMARIA for i love fake magazine

I spot a Girls Get Busy necklace :)

gradientlair:

CeCe McDonald was released from prison (should’ve never been there in the first place; see Support CeCe and Prison Culture for why). She’s hanging out with Laverne Cox! Listening to Beyoncé! They will be spending some time together since Laverne is creating a documentary on CeCe. (I may have bawled a bit.)

While the long awaited good news is here, I think of two important things that @PrisonCulture alluded to: One is that someone serving time for self-defense in a transmisogynistic, misogynoiristic and racist society and then being released is not “justice.” Justice would have occurred if she had a right to defend herself in the first place! Second thing is that the work is not done for trans people. She shared a link to the transformative justice project and other links were shared in the hashtag that I am about to mention.

A hashtag, #BecauseofCeCe was started by @JanetMock that included beautiful sentiments about CeCe and discussed the importance of justice for trans women. I saw cis and trans people alike in that tag with incredibly beautiful words. Janet also penned a letter to CeCe, part of which I could feel Maya Angelou’s Still I Rise in:

Activist and community members around the world have chanted, ‘FREE CECE.’ But I know you have been free this entire time. No one could take that from you. Your narrative alone, in your own words, with your own beauty and power and love and graciousness, showed me that I did not need to fight for your freedom. Your life was yours. Your body was held captive. But you were always free.

So, that’s one of the most beautiful things I’ve ever read. She goes on in the letter to discuss critical intersectional issues that speak to CeCe’s experience—ones often ignored even within LGBTQIA spaces, because of White supremacy and patriarchy, no less. Critical post.

Cheering for CeCe and wishing her the absolute best in life. 

beaniebabesclub:

#zines Bunny Collective, OOMK, You’re A Pain In The Ass, Salt, The Le Sigh, I Trust My Guitar, Feminist Art Coloring Book, Illuminati Girl Gang <3

beaniebabesclub:

#zines Bunny Collective, OOMK, You’re A Pain In The Ass, Salt, The Le Sigh, I Trust My Guitar, Feminist Art Coloring Book, Illuminati Girl Gang <3