Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians.

free zines: issuu.com/ggbzine

womanhouse:

Cole Chickering, Model Behavior #1, (2014)

a printed collection via womans-day 

What counts as activism? Why didn’t the kind of emotional self-care me and my girls were doing—talking to each other about all the fucked-up shit we were going through as brown girls—count? Why didn’t my best friend driving her elderly East African mother to the doctor and renegotiating her way through the layers of the racist, sexist, condescending bullshit medical system count as activism? Did staying alive count as activism? Did re-learning Tamil, one of my Sri Lankan family’s languages, count? Did cooking good Sri Lankan food and learning how to cook those recipes I didn’t have female family members around to teach me count? As a South Asian femme immigrant who was having a shitty week, did shopping at the MAC counter and finding the perfect shade of fuchsia lip gloss for my milk-tea skin count?

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, “A Time to Hole Up And a Time to Kick Ass” in We Don’t Need Another Wave (via seashells4teeth)

(Source: irresistible-revolution, via seashells4teeth)

kittydoom:

A Multi-Function Clip That Hides a Toolbox In Your Hair

ethiopienne:

Help fund Happy Birthday, Marsha!

Happy Birthday, Marsha! tells the story of legendary best friends, Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, and the bold everyday decisions they made that helped spark the 1969 Stonewall riots. 

When Marsha and Sylvia, self-proclaimed “street queens” – homeless, Black & Latina trans women – ignite the Stonewall Rebellion, they change LGBT politics forever. It’s a hot summer day in June, 1969. Marsha throws a party, but no one shows up. Meanwhile, Sylvia gets stoned and forgets the party after unsuccessfully introducing her lover to her family. Throughout the difficult day, the friends struggle with harassment and alienation before converging at the Stonewall Inn to finally celebrate Marsha’s birth. Unbeknownst to them, the NYPD has plans to raid the bar that night. Happy Birthday, Marsha! is the story of two brave best friends and the everyday decisions they made that changed the course of history.

Why are we making Happy Birthday, Marsha?
We truly believe how we tell the stories of our heroes matters, so we are drawing upon our community to make this film because we have an opportunity to make a movie written, directed and produced by people living Sylvia & Marsha’s legacy through our own work. It’s been 45 years since the Stonewall rebellion yet the leading role that street queens, trans women of color and gender non-conforming people had during the riots hasn’t received the recognition it deserves. By making Happy Birthday, Marsha! we are seeking to change that, but we need your help to make it happen.

eggsackley:

laura callaghan

eggsackley:

laura callaghan

(via 2brwngrls)

Growing up, I didn’t read novels by women. It’s not that I didn’t want to. It’s almost like I didn’t think that I needed to or, I guess, I didn’t know that I needed to. I was perfectly happy in a world contained by men. I adopted the posture of the brooding male as my own. I was Salinger, I was Kerouac, I was any male protagonist in a novel that one of my boyfriends recommended. I didn’t know that there was a specific female sadness so I was content with relating to a generalized one. And in a way, reading these novels was less of a way to relate and more of a way to learn how to be the type of girl that these male novelists liked. One of my first ambitions wasn’t to be a writer – it was to be a writer’s muse.

— Gabby Bess, in Dazed (via electric-cereal)

(via seemstween)

oomkzine:

OOMK online shop now open! www.oomkzine.bigcartel.com

One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press publication. Their content largely pivots upon the imaginations, creativity and spirituality of women.

OOMK is present in print, online and in creative events and workshops. While OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds they are especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women.

oomkzine:

OOMK online shop now open! www.oomkzine.bigcartel.com

One of My Kind (OOMK) is a highly visual, handcrafted small-press publication. Their content largely pivots upon the imaginations, creativity and spirituality of women.

OOMK is present in print, online and in creative events and workshops. While OOMK welcomes contributions from women of diverse ethnic and spiritual backgrounds they are especially keen to be inclusive of Muslim women.

nakeyab:

Staging beauty through material products and human by-products created between the 70s & 80s. Re-imagining a black feminist identity without the physical presence the body.
www.nakeyab.com

nakeyab:

Staging beauty through material products and human by-products created between the 70s & 80s. Re-imagining a black feminist identity without the physical presence the body.

www.nakeyab.com

(via immigrantgirls)

neptunain:

heteronormativity is so weird like yesterday I was at my aunts beach house and some of her in-laws brought over this small baby. and the baby puts it’s hand on it’s brow to keep the sun out of it’s eyes and his father says “look at that! Leon is looking for girls!” Leon is eight months old I don’t think he knows what a girl is yet

(via feministsuperpowers)

radgirlcollective:

3RD ST 63 AVE by Luz Orozco, Acrylic paint and colored pencil on black paper

"I immigrated to the United States in 2001 when I was four years old and this was the first house we lived in… Since I was so small I don’t have a clear memory of this house so I asked my mom and I used photos to make a series of this first home. Using my mom’s memory, mine, and photos, I created a new version of what this house was like. The flat colors and empty spaces represent my basic memory and how I could never fully understand what this home meant to the rest of my family."

From Rad Girl Collective Vol.1 Issue 1: First Times

(via thecoalitionmag)