Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians.

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Do you feel that digital culture and new media have created a new feminist language?

I don’t know that it has created a new feminist language - but it has certainly created new forums for discussions around issues of misogyny especially within digital contexts. It has also created a space to visualize solidarity and hold individuals accountable for their views and actions. There is a lot of rallying and organizing going on. Twitter is the new public space in which you can loudly and publicly air grievances against companies. Secret Facebook groups are the new salon, in which discourse is being debated into the late hours of the evening and early morning. A lot of people are really frustrated with the level of saturation of social media and integration of apps into their lives - but these technologies are also allowing for the self-publishing and creation of safe-spaces for otherwise marginalized and underrepresented artists to have their valid voices less mediated by male dominated gallery publishing worlds.

Beauty privilege is very real. None of us are imagining it, and if we aren’t born genetic lottery winners, our only option is to compensate with style, grace, and charm. Of course, none of that shit comes cheap. That’s kind of the whole point. It’s all meant to be aspirational and exclusionary. We’re supposed to feel depressed by our skin, agitated by our bodies, and anxious about our invisibility. That’s the insidious subtlety of social control.

The worst part is that we know in our rational minds that it’s all bullshit, and yet we’re still plagued with self-loathing when we can’t live up to unattainable beauty standards. No matter how much self-acceptance we achieve, we can still look in the mirror and instantly catalog all the things about ourselves that we don’t think measure up. It’s maddening. It makes us feel like hypocrites even though it’s not our hypocrisy.

diycultures:

ZINE FAIR @ DIY Cultures 2014

******************
The Zine Fair will take place over two floors from 12-7pm, Click here for FB event page. 
******************
Esther McManus
Eyeball Comix  
Adi Hollander
Feline Vomitus
Crumb Cabin
Michael Adebayo 
Mark Pawson
Cool Schmool ZInes  
STRIKE!
Avery Hill Publishing
Kirsty Fife
Two magpies
Gareth Brookes
OOMK
Caroly Storey
Diana Stanga
Flamingo Magazine
Interactive Monster Unit
Conjunction 
Microcosmic Orbit
Monster Emporium Press
Ben Rider
Ryan Humphrey 
Poems Underwater
Vampire Sushi
Other Asias
UWE in Bristol
Kingston Make/Do
Camino Studio
Akina Books
Animated Review/Henry Press
Tania MiraisomiA
Becky Kidner 
Not Shut Up 
Pluto Press
Numbi
Occupied Times,
John Hughes,
DAMTP
Steve Larder
Musaraña Libros
Rosemary Kirton and Thom Dinsdales
Alex Hahn Publishing
Julie Kane
DUPE
No Brainer Zine
Dead Trees and Dye
Cageprisoners   
Neil van der Knutsen
Tiny Pencil 
Atiah Z & Rudy 
Sam Giles
Julie Kane
Usman Ahmed 
Belly Kids 
Bearguts
Athemaura Zines
Shiori Clark

diycultures:

ZINE FAIR @ DIY Cultures 2014

******************

The Zine Fair will take place over two floors from 12-7pm, Click here for FB event page. 

******************

Esther McManus

Eyeball Comix  

Adi Hollander

Feline Vomitus

Crumb Cabin

Michael Adebayo 

Mark Pawson

Cool Schmool ZInes  

STRIKE!

Avery Hill Publishing

Kirsty Fife

Two magpies

Gareth Brookes

OOMK

Caroly Storey

Diana Stanga

Flamingo Magazine

Interactive Monster Unit

Conjunction 

Microcosmic Orbit

Monster Emporium Press

Ben Rider

Ryan Humphrey 

Poems Underwater

Vampire Sushi

Other Asias

UWE in Bristol

Kingston Make/Do

Camino Studio

Akina Books

Animated Review/Henry Press

Tania MiraisomiA

Becky Kidner 

Not Shut Up 

Pluto Press

Numbi

Occupied Times,

John Hughes,

DAMTP

Steve Larder

Musaraña Libros

Rosemary Kirton and Thom Dinsdales

Alex Hahn Publishing

Julie Kane

DUPE

No Brainer Zine

Dead Trees and Dye

Cageprisoners   

Neil van der Knutsen

Tiny Pencil

Atiah Z & Rudy

Sam Giles

Julie Kane

Usman Ahmed

Belly Kids

Bearguts

Athemaura Zines

Shiori Clark

Riots Not Diets presents ESG + SHOPPING in Brighton, 27th June!
The legendary Scroggins sisters, Emerald, Sapphire and Gold shot from the Bronx in the early 80s, the angular post punk funk sounds we all know and love today came entirely from them. And they do it better than anyone else. Their brief UK tour earlier this year marked their return to European live appearances and they say this will mark their final trip across the Atlantic. 
Support from SHOPPING - a queer disco/punk supergroup, and veterans of many previous RND nights. Their album, Consumer Complaints, on Milk Records is one of the best things.
Traumfrau's LEESEY will be bringing the party in between bands!
Tickets available at Seetickets and WeGotTicketsFacebook event here!

Riots Not Diets presents ESG + SHOPPING in Brighton, 27th June!

The legendary Scroggins sisters, Emerald, Sapphire and Gold shot from the Bronx in the early 80s, the angular post punk funk sounds we all know and love today came entirely from them. And they do it better than anyone else. Their brief UK tour earlier this year marked their return to European live appearances and they say this will mark their final trip across the Atlantic.

Support from SHOPPING - a queer disco/punk supergroup, and veterans of many previous RND nights. Their album, Consumer Complaints, on Milk Records is one of the best things.

Traumfrau's LEESEY will be bringing the party in between bands!

Tickets available at Seetickets and WeGotTickets
Facebook event here!

Society often blurs the lines between drag queens and trans women. This is highly problematic, because many people believe that, like drag queens, trans women go home, take off their wigs and chest plates, and walk around as men. Trans womanhood is not a performance or costume.

— Janet Mock, Redefining Realness (via inextinguishabledesires)

(Source: myserendipitousmoment, via cestlafemmenoire)

medievalpoc:


While Murray assumes considerable real estate in the foreground of the painting, there is great care in the representation of Belle. She is not darkened nor obscured, her gaze is fixed and direct; she is smiling and is dressed as an aristocrat. The portrait is exceptional for these reasons.
Other images of the period present a black identity negatively and these images exist in great abundance. And what we learn from looking back at these images is telling: the white European perception of our bodies, our beauty rendered in such monstrous ways to the edification of whiteness is the tool of white supremacy. 
We are very much still negotiating the impact of seeing images that erase and obscure black beauty and humanity today.
Our blended histories have yet to be accurately represented in popular consciousness, so every old story uncovered becomes a new retelling and a demand that we examine some painful truths about our past and how it shapes our present.

-Syreeta McFadden, “Belle Navigates Blurred Lines Between Race, Gender, and Class in 18th Century Britain” (feministing.com)
Medievalpoc posts tagged “Dido Elizabeth Belle”

medievalpoc:

While Murray assumes considerable real estate in the foreground of the painting, there is great care in the representation of Belle. She is not darkened nor obscured, her gaze is fixed and direct; she is smiling and is dressed as an aristocrat. The portrait is exceptional for these reasons.

Other images of the period present a black identity negatively and these images exist in great abundance. And what we learn from looking back at these images is telling: the white European perception of our bodies, our beauty rendered in such monstrous ways to the edification of whiteness is the tool of white supremacy.

We are very much still negotiating the impact of seeing images that erase and obscure black beauty and humanity today.

Our blended histories have yet to be accurately represented in popular consciousness, so every old story uncovered becomes a new retelling and a demand that we examine some painful truths about our past and how it shapes our present.

-Syreeta McFadden, “Belle Navigates Blurred Lines Between Race, Gender, and Class in 18th Century Britain” (feministing.com)

Medievalpoc posts tagged “Dido Elizabeth Belle

(via arabellesicardi)

princeowl:

the worst thing you can say to someone is ‘you’re too sensitive’ because that’s basically saying ‘you feel things more deeply and fully than i do and this inconveniences me because now i have to be more mindful of my own actions’ 

you’re not too sensitive, the world is just callous and stubborn. sensitivity doesn’t make you weak and callousness doesn’t make you strong. 

tenderblog:

tender is a quarterly journal made by women ~ issue 4 is online now

tenderblog:

tender is a quarterly journal made by women ~ issue 4 is online now

RESPECT TEENAGE GIRLS

RESPECT TEENAGE GIRLS

(Source: lucyannr, via tenderblog)