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Girls Get Busy Interview: Arm Candy

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Sarah interviews Kate Meizner from the band, Arm Candy about musicianship, being a girl in band and the Brooklyn music scene. Kate mentions a ton of bands in the meanwhile, so go forth and follow the links!

Hi, Kate, you’re in the band Arm Candy. Can you tell me a little about how you found your bandmates/formed the band?

A friend of mine from the internet (very millennial) introduced me to Carey (drummer of Arm Candy) at a show in early 2013. I was playing in an indie pop band at the time and was looking for a heavier project, so when Carey mentioned that Arm Candy needed a bassist, I was really jazzed about playing with them. The first demo, which isn’t online anymore, definitely had some ill riffs I could get down with. Emails were exchanged, and I had my first practice with Carey and Nathan where we jammed a few songs and hung out with Carey’s cool dog. Very good vibes. We started practicing every week and I was thrilled to just hang out and write songs, which I hadn’t done a lot of in my other band.

What kind of previous band experiences did you have? How long has this been part of your life?

I’ve been playing guitar since I was 14 - before that I played clarinet and totally sucked at it, so my dad went and exchanged it for a Peavey. Around the same time, I was getting into a bunch of ‘turn of the century’ early 00s pop punk and older punk like X and Black Flag. I remember listening to The Ramones and thinking ‘hey this song is only three notes…I can do this,’ so one night I stole my dad’s guitar and taught myself some chords. Then, when my 9th grade English teacher assigned a project to create a piece of art about a book we were reading, I chose it as an opportunity to write an alarmingly depressing and terrible pop song, which I played on an unamplified electric guitar in front of my class. I recall having a huge zit on my forehead.

I have a really weird band CV ranging from punk/pop punk to like…prog rock. In Western Mass I was in hardcore punk band called Honeysuck with Ally Einbinder (now the bassist in Potty Mouth) Sam Chaplin, and Marc Candilore (Tampered Reels). We put out a tape called All Your Lipsticks Are Bombs to Us where I’m playing guitar. I was in that band until I relocated to New York in 2011.

Most recently, I played in a jangly indie pop band called Gondola. I finished recording an album with them in December, and we released a four track 7” last March.

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(Source: girlsgetbusyzine)

Poor Lass Zine #3 - The family Issue 
A zine from the voices of poor lasses, a collection of stories of what it’s really like to be working class. Issue three focuses on family. How you relate to your family, how your family function, families you build yourself, what family means to you and more!  
Collected by Em and Seleena who want Poor Lasses to be heard
£2 and available to buy here!
Poor Lass is a positive collective zine featuring real experiences of growing up or identifying as working class with a queer feminist slant.
Poor Lass Facebook page

Poor Lass Zine #3 - The family Issue 

A zine from the voices of poor lasses, a collection of stories of what it’s really like to be working class. Issue three focuses on family. How you relate to your family, how your family function, families you build yourself, what family means to you and more! 

Collected by Em and Seleena who want Poor Lasses to be heard

£2 and available to buy here!

Poor Lass is a positive collective zine featuring real experiences of growing up or identifying as working class with a queer feminist slant.

Poor Lass Facebook page

goodnightout:

You’ll find these posters in pubs, bars, clubs and venues across London very soon.
Tweet us a pic @hollabackldn if you spot one, and use the hashtag goodnightout to let us know your experiences!

Good Night Out is the first London-wide, independent campaign to end harassment in pubs, clubs, bars and venues. Coordinated by anti-street harassment group Hollaback London, it calls upon all night-time venues to sign a pledge that harassment will not go unchallenged in their spaces, and that they are committed to providing a safe, fun and supportive night out for their women and LGBTQ customers. Hollaback London provides posters with the pledge to keep customers informed, and offering staff resources and training to put this into practice.

goodnightout:

You’ll find these posters in pubs, bars, clubs and venues across London very soon.

Tweet us a pic @hollabackldn if you spot one, and use the hashtag goodnightout to let us know your experiences!

Good Night Out is the first London-wide, independent campaign to end harassment in pubs, clubs, bars and venues. Coordinated by anti-street harassment group Hollaback London, it calls upon all night-time venues to sign a pledge that harassment will not go unchallenged in their spaces, and that they are committed to providing a safe, fun and supportive night out for their women and LGBTQ customers. Hollaback London provides posters with the pledge to keep customers informed, and offering staff resources and training to put this into practice.

galspace:

soap•box (sōp′bŏks′) n. 1. A carton in which soap is packed. 2. A temporary platform used while making an impromptu or nonofficial public speech. intr.v. soap•boxed, soap•box•ing, soap•box•es Informal To engage in impromptu or nonofficial public speaking, often flamboyantly.
 The Coven presents Soapbox. A show ranging in mixed media, saturated with meaning and intent of just what is means to be a female artist in todays society. Subtle differences in the work cite that each piece has been carefully positioned to not only interact with the audience but with each other, adding a sense of humanity to the objects.
The Coven is an internet based all female identified collective and in this show at Gal they’ll showcase works by Hanna Le Feuvre, Liv Thurley, Patricia Alvarado, Samantha Conlon and Sasha Cresdee.
The Coven FacebookThe Coven TumblrEvent

galspace:

soap•box (sōp′bŏks′)
n.
1. A carton in which soap is packed.
2. A temporary platform used while making an impromptu or nonofficial public speech.
intr.v. soap•boxed, soap•box•ing, soap•box•es Informal
To engage in impromptu or nonofficial public speaking, often flamboyantly.


The Coven presents Soapbox. A show ranging in mixed media, saturated with meaning and intent of just what is means to be a female artist in todays society. Subtle differences in the work cite that each piece has been carefully positioned to not only interact with the audience but with each other, adding a sense of humanity to the objects.

The Coven is an internet based all female identified collective and in this show at Gal they’ll showcase works by Hanna Le Feuvre, Liv Thurley, Patricia Alvarado, Samantha Conlon and Sasha Cresdee.

The Coven Facebook
The Coven Tumblr
Event

Girls Get Busy Review - Madelyn Villano
written by Millie Minou
Madelyn Villano is a Portland-based multi-instrumentalist musician who records under several different monikers including Guzo and Giggles. At just 24 years old, she has managed to cultivate an impressive discography already.
Villano has been a member of the influential experimental noise group, Smegma, since 2011 in which she plays violin and electronics. For those who don’t know Smegma (I tried to start this sentence, like, 9 different ways because I get it, but I mean the band!!!) – besides having the best name ever – they are one of the few music collectives still performing and recording from the Los Angeles Free Music Society movement of the 1970s. They have collaborated with many of experimental music’s greats including Merzbow, Wolf Eyes, Non, and John Wiese. It seems unlikely that such a young person would be accepted into as venerated a group as Smegma but Villano’s presence in the band makes total sense: she is incredibly talented. Her available solo work is mostly comprised of hypnotic, ambient soundscapes. Sometimes building up from one pulsing loop, sometimes distorted, sometimes interwoven with ethereal, minimal house-y rhythms, every track I’ve heard of hers is great.
Villano’s music is lush and intricate with moments of heart-tugging, deep, dissonant swells or 30-second excerpts where you’re just like, “fuck, that sounds so cool!!!” There is even some dreamy piano composition happening in the latter portion of the second tape up on her soundcloud (link below). Beyond her obvious musical abilities, Villano is also active in the DIY community of Portland and has contributed to events such as Portland’s Females of Color Fest, which means she is likely, a Good Human whom you should have no qualms supporting. She is currently taking a brief hiatus from independent projects in order to finish up college with a degree in music (focusing her studies in ethnomusicology) but is planning on organizing a new tape soon. For now, check out everything the internet has to offer of her work (especially the last link where you can purchase tapes from Pigface Records including her debut, American Girl, and other projects with which she’s been involved):
Madelyn Villano - Guitar + Distortion
Giggles - Stress. Without You. Forgiving.
soundcloud.com/guzotapes
Pigface Records

Girls Get Busy Review - Madelyn Villano

written by Millie Minou

Madelyn Villano is a Portland-based multi-instrumentalist musician who records under several different monikers including Guzo and Giggles. At just 24 years old, she has managed to cultivate an impressive discography already.

Villano has been a member of the influential experimental noise group, Smegma, since 2011 in which she plays violin and electronics. For those who don’t know Smegma (I tried to start this sentence, like, 9 different ways because I get it, but I mean the band!!!) – besides having the best name ever – they are one of the few music collectives still performing and recording from the Los Angeles Free Music Society movement of the 1970s. They have collaborated with many of experimental music’s greats including Merzbow, Wolf Eyes, Non, and John Wiese. It seems unlikely that such a young person would be accepted into as venerated a group as Smegma but Villano’s presence in the band makes total sense: she is incredibly talented. Her available solo work is mostly comprised of hypnotic, ambient soundscapes. Sometimes building up from one pulsing loop, sometimes distorted, sometimes interwoven with ethereal, minimal house-y rhythms, every track I’ve heard of hers is great.

Villano’s music is lush and intricate with moments of heart-tugging, deep, dissonant swells or 30-second excerpts where you’re just like, “fuck, that sounds so cool!!!” There is even some dreamy piano composition happening in the latter portion of the second tape up on her soundcloud (link below). Beyond her obvious musical abilities, Villano is also active in the DIY community of Portland and has contributed to events such as Portland’s Females of Color Fest, which means she is likely, a Good Human whom you should have no qualms supporting. She is currently taking a brief hiatus from independent projects in order to finish up college with a degree in music (focusing her studies in ethnomusicology) but is planning on organizing a new tape soon. For now, check out everything the internet has to offer of her work (especially the last link where you can purchase tapes from Pigface Records including her debut, American Girl, and other projects with which she’s been involved):

Madelyn Villano - Guitar + Distortion

Giggles - Stress. Without You. Forgiving.

soundcloud.com/guzotapes

Pigface Records

(Source: girlsgetbusyzine)

julianahuxtable:
I did an interview and shoot with my sister, and friend Lyndsy Welgos' Magazine Tropical Cream. I talked about my relationship to nightlife, why I started #SHOCKVALUENYC, the trans* ppl who inspire me and why I’m so excited by the moment we’re having in NYC right now.
XOXO Juliana

julianahuxtable:

I did an interview and shoot with my sister, and friend Lyndsy Welgos' Magazine Tropical Cream. I talked about my relationship to nightlife, why I started #SHOCKVALUENYC, the trans* ppl who inspire me and why I’m so excited by the moment we’re having in NYC right now.

XOXO Juliana
oomkzine:

Black Feminists is proud to present an evening of celebration, showcasing the power and creativity of black women writers, spoken word artists and performers. This is the second in a series of Black Feminists events that aim to facilitate public platforms for black women’s creative expression. The evening is also part of Women of the World festival’s series of WoW parties that aim to celebrate the work of charities and organisations that support women in the UK and internationally.
Location: Level Four – Blue Bar, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank CentreDate: Wednesday 5th MarchTime: 7.30pm – 9.30pmSuggested Donation: £3Who: We welcome all interested parties and allies to the event
Performers include Bridget Minamore, Selina Nwulu, Kaddish Morris, Anna Lau, Belinda Zhawi,Chimene Suleyman, and Laila Sumpton, as well as a reading by a member of the art collective One of My Kind (OOMK).
We will also feature a community news slot, inviting audience members to take the stage publicising future community events. There will also be a fully licensed bar on the premises.
You can also join us for the WoW opening party on the same day in The Clore Ballroom at 6.00 pm. For further information on tickets and submissions for the community news slot please email us at events@blackfeminists.org.

oomkzine:

Black Feminists is proud to present an evening of celebration, showcasing the power and creativity of black women writers, spoken word artists and performers. This is the second in a series of Black Feminists events that aim to facilitate public platforms for black women’s creative expression. The evening is also part of Women of the World festival’s series of WoW parties that aim to celebrate the work of charities and organisations that support women in the UK and internationally.

Location: Level Four – Blue Bar, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre
Date: Wednesday 5th March
Time: 7.30pm – 9.30pm
Suggested Donation: £3
Who: We welcome all interested parties and allies to the event

Performers include Bridget MinamoreSelina NwuluKaddish Morris, Anna Lau, Belinda Zhawi,Chimene Suleyman, and Laila Sumpton, as well as a reading by a member of the art collective One of My Kind (OOMK).

We will also feature a community news slot, inviting audience members to take the stage publicising future community events. There will also be a fully licensed bar on the premises.

You can also join us for the WoW opening party on the same day in The Clore Ballroom at 6.00 pm. For further information on tickets and submissions for the community news slot please email us at events@blackfeminists.org.

deadlydinos:

It’s not punk to antagonize minimum wage workers.

strangeasanjles:

Like writing shit on bathroom stalls, making messes in grocery and big box stores, trashing hotel rooms, yelling at actual workers about how horrible their capitalist employers are. Stop doing this shit. You are making life harder for those you claim to identify with and want to help.

(via 420sadgirlsclub)

Facebook recently unveiled a slew of new pronoun and gender options for its profile, a frequently requested feature among transgender users.
In addition to being able to select from “male,” “female,” or “gender-neutral” pronouns, users can now enter their gender as they see fit. “Androgyne,” “Pangender,” “Bi-gender,” “Agender,” “Trans Woman,” “Transsexual,” “Trans* Man,” “Cis woman,” and dozens of other gender-identifying options are now available to users by selecting the “custom” option in the profile’s “Basic Information” section. The new gender identity listing also has a built-in privacy setting, allowing users to determine who is able to view their gender identity when looking at their profile.
Facebook Expands Gender Options for Trans and Gender-Nonconforming Users

Facebook recently unveiled a slew of new pronoun and gender options for its profile, a frequently requested feature among transgender users.

In addition to being able to select from “male,” “female,” or “gender-neutral” pronouns, users can now enter their gender as they see fit. “Androgyne,” “Pangender,” “Bi-gender,” “Agender,” “Trans Woman,” “Transsexual,” “Trans* Man,” “Cis woman,” and dozens of other gender-identifying options are now available to users by selecting the “custom” option in the profile’s “Basic Information” section. The new gender identity listing also has a built-in privacy setting, allowing users to determine who is able to view their gender identity when looking at their profile.

Facebook Expands Gender Options for Trans and Gender-Nonconforming Users

seemstween:

“In tandem with the dilemma that technologically savvy women are simply defecting from competitive start-up culture is the fact that the notion of a rigid path into ‘the tech world’ has hardly ever been a reality for women. Historically, women have been excluded from these spaces and are charged with the task of disrupting them, not assimilating into them. In her essay, Why Are There No Great Women Net Artists? (after Linda Nochlin’s 1988 essay, Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?) Jennifer Chan states, ‘Cyberfeminists of the nineties sought to achieve equal technological footing to their male programming counterparts by ideologically infiltrating communication networks with sexually charged dissent. They posted their manifestos on mailing lists, message boards, and self-organized websites.’ 
Though outside of pursuing strict programming degrees, outside of ‘the tech world’ in a strict sense, women – the women who may have used their ‘hacking’ skills to claim a seat on the board of Twitter – have come to view the internet as a means of radical assertion. Traditional cyberfeminist framework is optimistic in a woman’s place online as the resister. Cyberfeminist scholar Sadie Plant shares her vision of ‘women, computers, virtual reality, and cyberpace’ as intimately linked and in this new, unclaimed space of the internet women have the power to dismantle the patriarchy. However, in its emphasis of resistance and assertion, this framework might be the problem. The internet is not and was never an unclaimed space. It exists and was born out of the culture of the white male, where early cyberfeminists had to fight to hold court. In its most essentialist form, the problem could be viewed in these terms: The woman in tech is concerned with the personal and legitimizing the self and the man in tech, secure in his identity online and in the world, does not seek out the internet as a place to assert his self. Not having to disrupt any existing framework, he is concerned with his next start-up venture selling to Facebook for 3 billion dollars.”
- Girls Who Code: Creating a New Wave of Cyberfeminists? 

seemstween:

In tandem with the dilemma that technologically savvy women are simply defecting from competitive start-up culture is the fact that the notion of a rigid path into ‘the tech world’ has hardly ever been a reality for women. Historically, women have been excluded from these spaces and are charged with the task of disrupting them, not assimilating into them. In her essay, Why Are There No Great Women Net Artists? (after Linda Nochlin’s 1988 essay, Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?) Jennifer Chan states, ‘Cyberfeminists of the nineties sought to achieve equal technological footing to their male programming counterparts by ideologically infiltrating communication networks with sexually charged dissent. They posted their manifestos on mailing lists, message boards, and self-organized websites.’

Though outside of pursuing strict programming degrees, outside of ‘the tech world’ in a strict sense, women – the women who may have used their ‘hacking’ skills to claim a seat on the board of Twitter – have come to view the internet as a means of radical assertion. Traditional cyberfeminist framework is optimistic in a woman’s place online as the resister. Cyberfeminist scholar Sadie Plant shares her vision of ‘women, computers, virtual reality, and cyberpace’ as intimately linked and in this new, unclaimed space of the internet women have the power to dismantle the patriarchy. However, in its emphasis of resistance and assertion, this framework might be the problem. The internet is not and was never an unclaimed space. It exists and was born out of the culture of the white male, where early cyberfeminists had to fight to hold court. In its most essentialist form, the problem could be viewed in these terms: The woman in tech is concerned with the personal and legitimizing the self and the man in tech, secure in his identity online and in the world, does not seek out the internet as a place to assert his self. Not having to disrupt any existing framework, he is concerned with his next start-up venture selling to Facebook for 3 billion dollars.”

- Girls Who Code: Creating a New Wave of Cyberfeminists? 

(via roughguess)