Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians.

Read free zines online: issuu.com/ggbzine

Water permeable nail polish info update - please read!

voltisubito:

DON’T ACTUALLY USE INGLOT FOR THE SAKE OF WATER PERMEABILITY. IT’S NOT VERY EFFECTIVE.

It’s only water vapor permeable, and it’s not at all water permeable when you apply multiple coats, a top coat, or a base coat.

You should use the Tuesday In Love water-permeable brands instead! They’re completely water permeable and come in a whole ton of colors!

Here’s a test that a sister did comparing the Inglot brand and the Tuesday In Love brand on a paper towel so you can see for yourself.

please please please spread this around, I would hate for a lot of sisters to have their prayers invalidated because of something like this.

dashuri96:

http://www.inglotcosmetics.com/nails/products/141

this retailer sells a halal nail polish. this allows for oxygen and water to go through the nail, which makes it acceptable to wear during prayer. spread the word. 

Being a relatively modern creation, nail polish remains obviously unaddressed by early Islamic sources. But the general consensus in the Islamic community is that praying with nail polish is impermissible because of the waterproof barrier it creates on nails, which prevents the wudu ritual from being completed five times a day. - source

girlification:

"Like, u know. The word like is like, seen as something redundant, like the way female coded objects are like, u know, well, the colour pink or u wearing lipstick is seen as something unnecessary, but like, for some people it’s still like pretty enjoyable and it’s not like it’s hurting anyone else really. And then like, the verb ‘to like’ something online is like, you know, when ur getting that ‘like’, you know what ur social value is in a money-driven society. But like at the same time it’s like based on something pretty positive and like actually some kind of support when like, u know u r liking someone’s selfie. U know, if we like think about ‘liking’ in relationship to selfie haters, well it might not be sellable to like hate on selfies but like, it’s pretty mean. But like yeah.”
♡ Likeable art by Patricia Alvarado, Gabby Bess, Cristine Brache, Arvida Bystöm, Jennifer Chan, Anna Crews, Rosemary Kirton, Mikkeline Sofie Larsson, Maja Malou Lyse, Jillian Mayer, Molly Soda, Camgirlsproject/Vanessa Omoregie, and more! ♡Gallery will be open between sat 19th - mon 21st April @12.00-18.00 
Follow on Instagram @like2bliked
LIKE is curated by Maja Malou Lyse and Arvida Bystöm

girlification:

"Like, u know. The word like is like, seen as something redundant, like the way female coded objects are like, u know, well, the colour pink or u wearing lipstick is seen as something unnecessary, but like, for some people it’s still like pretty enjoyable and it’s not like it’s hurting anyone else really. 
And then like, the verb ‘to like’ something online is like, you know, when ur getting that ‘like’, you know what ur social value is in a money-driven society. But like at the same time it’s like based on something pretty positive and like actually some kind of support when like, u know u r liking someone’s selfie. U know, if we like think about ‘liking’ in relationship to selfie haters, well it might not be sellable to like hate on selfies but like, it’s pretty mean. But like yeah.”

♡ Likeable art by Patricia Alvarado, Gabby Bess, Cristine Brache, Arvida Bystöm, Jennifer Chan, Anna Crews, Rosemary Kirton, Mikkeline Sofie Larsson, Maja Malou Lyse, Jillian Mayer, Molly Soda, Camgirlsproject/Vanessa Omoregie, and more! ♡

Gallery will be open between sat 19th - mon 21st April @12.00-18.00
 

Follow on Instagram @like2bliked

LIKE is curated by Maja Malou Lyse and Arvida Bystöm

hanecdote:

Can you see what I see? If you see a Hanecdote original printed on a crappy tshirt without my consent, Im asking all of my followers and supporters to please email enquiries@primark.co.uk with the Subject “Hanecdote cares” and CC in hanecdote@hotmail.com, expressing your concern about the situation. Below are other Primark social media sites, feel free to let them know that theyre taking advantage of a struggling young artist. Its no secret Ive struggled with mental health and your support through Hanecdote has helped me in so many ways. They will not turn me into a Prozac Princess (dont try and steal that idea, Primark!) 

Primark Facebook

Primark Twitter

Please include @hanecdote or #hanecdote and thank you so much for all your past and future support. 

(Source: 420sadgirlsclub)

Girls Get Busy Mixtape: I’m quitting my job
You know when it’s time
Featuring: Kelis / MIA / King Avriel / Beyonce / Lykke Li / Kelela + more
Listen at 8tracks.com/girlsgetbusyzine/i-m-quitting-my-job
Mix by HadeelArtwork source: Buffy

Girls Get Busy Mixtape: I’m quitting my job

You know when it’s time

Featuring: Kelis / MIA / King Avriel / Beyonce / Lykke Li / Kelela + more

Listen at 8tracks.com/girlsgetbusyzine/i-m-quitting-my-job

Mix by Hadeel
Artwork source: Buffy

Girls Get Busy #21 is finally finished and available for free online HERE
NOW IN COLOUR
Featuring: Patricia Alvarado, Hiba Argane, Darcie Blake, Naana Bodomo, Leslie Boroczk, Cristine Brache, Alyse Burnside, Katrina Cervoni, Samantha Conlon, Sammie Concilio, Zie Darling, Erin Dorney, Nora Drew, Azia Egbe, Malu Engel, Femtyechrome, Cecilia Ferraro, Georgia Grace Gibson, Dafy Hagai, S. Nicole Lane, Daisy Lafarge, Gena LeBlanc, Sonia Lopez, Laura Maw, Alanna McArdle, Katherine McBride, Rivers Henry McKenzie, Claire Milbrath, Beth Milner, Szilvia Molnar, Madeleine Moriarty, Jo Pink, Christina Poku, Livia Roscioli, Beth Siveyer, Cheyenne Sophia, Pamela Loredo Sustaita, Barbora Togel, Katerina P. Trichia, Ebonni Watford
Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians. Curated by Beth Siveyer
Cover artwork by Patricia Alvarado

Girls Get Busy #21 is finally finished and available for free online HERE

NOW IN COLOUR

Featuring: Patricia Alvarado, Hiba Argane, Darcie Blake, Naana Bodomo, Leslie Boroczk, Cristine Brache, Alyse Burnside, Katrina Cervoni, Samantha Conlon, Sammie Concilio, Zie Darling, Erin Dorney, Nora Drew, Azia Egbe, Malu Engel, Femtyechrome, Cecilia Ferraro, Georgia Grace Gibson, Dafy Hagai, S. Nicole Lane, Daisy Lafarge, Gena LeBlanc, Sonia Lopez, Laura Maw, Alanna McArdle, Katherine McBride, Rivers Henry McKenzie, Claire Milbrath, Beth Milner, Szilvia Molnar, Madeleine Moriarty, Jo Pink, Christina Poku, Livia Roscioli, Beth Siveyer, Cheyenne Sophia, Pamela Loredo Sustaita, Barbora Togel, Katerina P. Trichia, Ebonni Watford

Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports female-identified artists, writers and musicians. Curated by Beth Siveyer

Cover artwork by Patricia Alvarado

From May 8th - June 7th 2014, Soma Contemporary Gallery Waterford will present Bunny Collective: The Young Girl’s Gaze.
This exhibition will explore how young women exist online, and how the internet can be harnessed as a mode of self-expression. Through a variety of mediums including installation, video and photography, the work on display will investigate the ways in which new internet platforms have impacted on female identity, and in turn what it means to present yourself on-line as a female. 
Bunny Collective are an all-female art collective originally formed at the Crawford College of Art and Design in September 2013. Since their formation, they have expanded to include a number of UK-based artists and have attracted international interest, including interviews with Dazed and Confused, and Brooklyn-based zine, The Le Sigh. 
Bunny Collective: The Young Girl’s Gaze will feature work from a number of emerging artists based in Cork and London. Their work will engage with themes such as identity construction online and alter egos; consumerism; the body as capital; fragmentation of self; teenage obsession; and how the internet can provide a positive alternative to male-dominated areas of artistic tradition. French collective Tiqqun’s seminal text, Preliminary Materials for a Theory of the Young-Girl will offer an important theoretical framework for how each of the artists will approach these issues.
Facebook event page
Bunny Collective tumblr
bunnycollective.com

From May 8th - June 7th 2014, Soma Contemporary Gallery Waterford will present Bunny Collective: The Young Girl’s Gaze.

This exhibition will explore how young women exist online, and how the internet can be harnessed as a mode of self-expression. Through a variety of mediums including installation, video and photography, the work on display will investigate the ways in which new internet platforms have impacted on female identity, and in turn what it means to present yourself on-line as a female.

Bunny Collective are an all-female art collective originally formed at the Crawford College of Art and Design in September 2013. Since their formation, they have expanded to include a number of UK-based artists and have attracted international interest, including interviews with Dazed and Confused, and Brooklyn-based zine, The Le Sigh.

Bunny Collective: The Young Girl’s Gaze will feature work from a number of emerging artists based in Cork and London. Their work will engage with themes such as identity construction online and alter egos; consumerism; the body as capital; fragmentation of self; teenage obsession; and how the internet can provide a positive alternative to male-dominated areas of artistic tradition. French collective Tiqqun’s seminal text, Preliminary Materials for a Theory of the Young-Girl will offer an important theoretical framework for how each of the artists will approach these issues.

Facebook event page

Bunny Collective tumblr

bunnycollective.com

(via bunnycollective)

hagcollective:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
HAG COLLECTIVE - ECTOPLASMS

Ectoplasm refers to a vomit-like substance produced by mediums during seances, supposedly as a manifestation of otherworldly spirits. For this performance salon and accompanying zine, we would like to use the phenomenon of ectoplasm as a way of thinking about the creation of the abject, what for Julia Kristeva constitutes that which has been discharged from the body, rendered excrement. How does the body function as a sight of transactions, of exits and entrances? In what ways is the abject haunted? What ghosts are coming out of you?

GIVE US UR BLOOD UR TEARS UR PUKE.

If you would like to perform in the salon, please email hagcollective@gmail.com a few sentences outlining what you would like to do by the 11th of April, 2014. Performances should be 5-15 minutes long, though we may also consider durational performances.

For the accompanying zine, we are looking for text and images—anything that can be printed—that engage the above themes. Please email zine submissions to hagcollective@gmail.com by the 18th of April 2014.

SALT. #5 - The Anti-Work issue
To live and to labour, or to live as labour, is to negotiate the extended processes of reproducing ourselves and our others that has come to define present modes of being. Codes and semiotics dictate our every interaction down to style, tone and gesture. However, the labour of ‘self-maintain’ occupies the interstices of both service and affective labour, requiring us to be accomplished at procuring and proffering semiotics, working in complicity with a larger set of hierarchies concerning how we perform and for whom.
This issue examines proposed alternatives that manifest a melancholic dissatisfaction and take pains, and pleasure, to disturb predetermined identities, systems, orders.
Contributors include; Maeve Brennan, Lloyd Corporation, Rózsa Farkas, Daisy Grove-Lafarge, Grace Harrison, Tom Hastings, Sophie Hoyle, Tommie Introna, Huw Lemmey, Kathryn O’Regan, Florence Peake, Hannah Perry, Charles Pryor, Hannah Regel, Thea Smith, Jala Wahid.
Perfect bound A5 book and available to buy here.

SALT. #5 - The Anti-Work issue

To live and to labour, or to live as labour, is to negotiate the extended processes of reproducing ourselves and our others that has come to define present modes of being. Codes and semiotics dictate our every interaction down to style, tone and gesture. However, the labour of ‘self-maintain’ occupies the interstices of both service and affective labour, requiring us to be accomplished at procuring and proffering semiotics, working in complicity with a larger set of hierarchies concerning how we perform and for whom.

This issue examines proposed alternatives that manifest a melancholic dissatisfaction and take pains, and pleasure, to disturb predetermined identities, systems, orders.

Contributors include; Maeve Brennan, Lloyd Corporation, Rózsa Farkas, Daisy Grove-Lafarge, Grace Harrison, Tom Hastings, Sophie Hoyle, Tommie Introna, Huw Lemmey, Kathryn O’Regan, Florence Peake, Hannah Perry, Charles Pryor, Hannah Regel, Thea Smith, Jala Wahid.

Perfect bound A5 book and available to buy here.

OOMK are co-organising DIY Cultures in East London again this year, if you make zines, comics etc applications for table space are now open!
diycultures:

Stall Applications for DIY Cultures 2014 NOW OPEN!
Call for Zines, Artists books, Illustrators, Comics, Distros
The Rich Mix will be hosting the second DIY Cultures: Zines, Artists Books and Comics on the 25th May 2014!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1452959404937771/
Tables are nine pounds but spaces are limited. To book a stall please contact diycultureszac@gmail.com with the following info:
- Who are you and what do you do?
- Where are you based?
- What kind of zines would you have at your table?
- What’s your price range? Would you be up for swaps?
- If you have a web page, please share it with us.There will be a FREE communal table for people with one-off zines to sell. Bring your zines on the day!
Workshops: We aim to have a small selection of workshops exploring zines and other world views plus a small program of practical zine-based workshop. If you’d like to run a workshop, talk or other activity, please email diycultureszac@gmail.com with the following details:
- Who are you, what do you do and where are you based?
- What is the title and general content of your workshop?
- What would your workshop involve participants doing?
- Would you be able to cover the budget of your workshop?
- Do you have any special requirements, or anything else you’d like to add?
- If you have a web page, please share it with us.
Places are limited so if you’d like a stall you’d better let us know soon!
DEADLINE: March 28th 2014
Thank you
OOMK Zine and Other Asias 

OOMK are co-organising DIY Cultures in East London again this year, if you make zines, comics etc applications for table space are now open!

diycultures:

Stall Applications for DIY Cultures 2014 NOW OPEN!

Call for Zines, Artists books, Illustrators, Comics, Distros

The Rich Mix will be hosting the second DIY Cultures: Zines, Artists Books and Comics on the 25th May 2014!

https://www.facebook.com/events/1452959404937771/

Tables are nine pounds but spaces are limited. To book a stall please contact diycultureszac@gmail.com with the following info:

- Who are you and what do you do?

- Where are you based?

- What kind of zines would you have at your table?

- What’s your price range? Would you be up for swaps?

- If you have a web page, please share it with us.

There will be a FREE communal table for people with one-off zines to sell. Bring your zines on the day!

Workshops: We aim to have a small selection of workshops exploring zines and other world views plus a small program of practical zine-based workshop. If you’d like to run a workshop, talk or other activity, please email diycultureszac@gmail.com with the following details:

- Who are you, what do you do and where are you based?

- What is the title and general content of your workshop?

- What would your workshop involve participants doing?

- Would you be able to cover the budget of your workshop?

- Do you have any special requirements, or anything else you’d like to add?

- If you have a web page, please share it with us.

Places are limited so if you’d like a stall you’d better let us know soon!

DEADLINE: March 28th 2014

Thank you

OOMK Zine and Other Asias 

(via oomkzine)

galspace:

Work from top 1) FaNtAsY 2) Keep ‘Em Coming 3) Thinking About Wanting To Be White in 2008 in 2013 4) 2 nests 5) Lol, Gurl Wut R U Hiding?

Next Gal will feature The Coven’s show Soapbox. Click click click!

Patricia Alvarado is a kick ass artist that grew up in Chicago, studied at the New York Studio Recsidency Program and is currently at her last year at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. One of her favourite works of her is a slow motion video (tell uuu uuu goootaa c it) called “I’m In It (I mean if sweet and sour sauce is really all you need to eat my Asian pussy)” (click!). Always awesome and with loads of new projects going on so keeeeep ut eyes open for dis ladY.

How did you get in to making art?
I was a pretty fucked up teenager, like drinking at 14, I lied about everything, and I was in an abusive relationship, and my parents we’re always super concerned about how I was gonna turn out, like if I was gonna even survive through high school/amount to anything in life, so they signed me up for this painting class on weekends where I basically copied Georgia O’Keefe paintings verbatim onto my own canvases. It probably did end up saving my life so props 2 my parents.

What artwork that isn’t made by you did you wish was made by you?
Rather than a specific artwork, I’m so in awe of the endurance and courage exhibited by performance artists, historically and currently. I want to channel that strength within my work, always.

If you could erase the existence of one artwork that you made, which one would it be?
Tbh I feel like every work I’ve made has contributed in some part to my artistic sensibilities. I started college as a photography major, and within the past year ended up switching to Fine Art because my work has changed SO much. But my photo background is a huge advantage for me when it comes to compositions + documentation. I mean a lot of my early work is embarrassingly simple and uninteresting, but I don’t think I’d erase any of it.

Three words about your work on Soapbox at gal space?
white supremacy sux