Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians.

free zines: issuu.com/ggbzine

patriciaalvarado:

u kno??? 2014

Patricia Alvarado

girlsgetbusyzine:

ZINE SUBMISSION CALL: If you’d like to contribute any art / words / photos / drawings / whatever to Girls Get Busy #23, please email your submissions to girlsgetbusyzine@gmail.com
DEADLINE: 20TH SEPTEMBER 2014
From now on all future GGB issues will be in full colour, so please bare that in mind when submitting ☺ Black and white submissions are still accepted 
Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians. You can read Girls Get Busy zines for free at issuu.com/ggbzine

girlsgetbusyzine:

ZINE SUBMISSION CALL: If you’d like to contribute any art / words / photos / drawings / whatever to Girls Get Busy #23, please email your submissions to girlsgetbusyzine@gmail.com

DEADLINE: 20TH SEPTEMBER 2014

From now on all future GGB issues will be in full colour, so please bare that in mind when submitting ☺ Black and white submissions are still accepted 

Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians. You can read Girls Get Busy zines for free at issuu.com/ggbzine

vvni:

Men and Women, stages of fear

(via vanessaomoregie)

Belonging showcases the works of Hobbes Ginsberg and Vivian Fu. Both artists use portraiture as a means of discovering and examining the oftentimes vulnerable, multifaceted identities of their selves and their relationships, particularly the point at which they intersect. Hobbes Ginsberg uses their living-room-turned-studio to create vibrant portraits and still lifes. Detailed and tender, their work navigates through past, present, and future versions of self. They are 20 years old and live in Los Angeles. Vivian Fu captures intimate fragments of her every day life. Pieced together, her snapshots construct a powerful dialogue of what it means for her to be an Asian American woman. She is 24 years old and based in San Francisco. Belonging is viewable at Pehrspace from September 13 to October 12. Opening reception is September 13 from 7-10pm. Both artists will be present. 
Facebook event page

Belonging showcases the works of Hobbes Ginsberg and Vivian Fu. Both artists use portraiture as a means of discovering and examining the oftentimes vulnerable, multifaceted identities of their selves and their relationships, particularly the point at which they intersect.

Hobbes Ginsberg uses their living-room-turned-studio to create vibrant portraits and still lifes. Detailed and tender, their work navigates through past, present, and future versions of self. They are 20 years old and live in Los Angeles.

Vivian Fu captures intimate fragments of her every day life. Pieced together, her snapshots construct a powerful dialogue of what it means for her to be an Asian American woman. She is 24 years old and based in San Francisco.

Belonging is viewable at Pehrspace from September 13 to October 12. Opening reception is September 13 from 7-10pm. Both artists will be present.

Facebook event page

(Source: vivian-fu)

Submission call for Cap Culture exhibition in Stockholm in collaboration with Beanie Babes !
Please send cap related art to emma.arvida.elisabeth@gmail.com
Caps aren’t just for white dudes!

arvidabystrom:


especially focusing on queer ways to use the cap.

xxxx

Submission call for Cap Culture exhibition in Stockholm in collaboration with Beanie Babes !


Please send cap related art to emma.arvida.elisabeth@gmail.com


Caps aren’t just for white dudes!

arvidabystrom:

especially focusing on queer ways to use the cap.

xxxx

(via beaniebabesclub)

no sleep

no sleep

(Source: mariainesgul, via tenderblog)

I believe that telling our stories, first to ourselves and then to one another and the world, is a revolutionary act. It is an act that can be met with hostility, exclusion, and violence. It can also lead to love, understanding, transcendence, and community.

— Janet Mock

(Source: stayherewithus)

hanecdote:

I’d like to take some time to talk about a couple things that are very close to my heart; Hanecdote and depression, When I launched the Ghoul Guide patches in June 2013 I had no ideas of the positivity they would spread across the world. They opened up a whole new platform for me to voice my beliefs in feminism and my experiences with depression and solidarity with mental health sufferers.

I’m writing this because I want to make people happy; I want to encourage people to love and be kind to themselves. I created a series of reward patches called ‘Little Victories; for that exact purpose, to give yourself a pat on the back for doing the little things which are so difficult for people who suffer with depression and anxiety. To buy for yourself as a “well done” or as a sign of support for a friend in a dark place; these patches serve multiple purposes. When I get feedback from my customers and followers my heart fills with joy knowing that I have impacted on someone’s mood as well as helping them on their own journey to happiness and self love.

I also just released a series called ‘Positivity Patches’ which is exactly what it says on the label. The aims of these patches are to spread a bit of brightness on an otherwise gloomy day whether that’s a message to yourself or those around you. I’ve suffered with depression since I was 14 and my experiences with it have deeply affected who I am and how I look at life. Depression affects so many people’s lives, not just the person suffering. It can feel like no one cares or that you’d be better off dead or like you’re a burden.

It’s a horrible lonely existence at worst and an emotionally draining burden at best. Suicide attempts, self harm and severe mood swings put my life on hold and prevented me from going to school properly. But despite that, I managed to get a BTEC Level 3 in Art and Design with only two GCSE’s and I’m now at university studying what I love. I still struggle everyday but if I can inspire and encourage someone else to keep going, I think I’ll be ok.

I like to think I am making a difference by producing these patches for people like me who need positive reinforcement. When I post my ‘Don’t Give Up’ patch on instagram and get comments like “I needed this <3” and “Thank you” all the late nights sewing have been worth it and even a small amount of sadness goes away for a while, knowing I’ve helped someone else. I hope I get to do this for a long time because it is the most rewarding thing I’ve ever achieved and it keeps me alive. Hanecdote’s prosperity and support keeps me alive and smiling even when my depression wants me curled up in bed. Thank you. 

laurencook94:

Two self portraits as Baby

Mostly, videogames are about men shooting men in the face. Sometimes they are about women shooting men in the face. Sometimes the men who are shot in the face are orcs, zombies, or monsters. Most of the other games the ESA is talking about when it mentions “units” are abstract games: the story of a blue square who waits for a player to place him in line with two other blue squares, so he can disappear forever. The few commercial games that involve a women protagonist in a role other than slaughter put her in a role of servitude: waiting tables at a diner (or a dress shop, a pet shop, a wedding party). This is not to say that games about head shots are without value, but if one looked solely at videogames, one would think the whole of human experience is shooting men and taking their dinner orders. Surely an artistic form that has as much weight in popular culture as the videogame does now has more to offer than such a narrow view of what it is to be human.

— Anna Anthropy (2012)- Rise of the Videogame Zinesters

(Source: dropouthangoutspaceout)