Girls Get Busy is a feminist creative platform that supports artists, writers and musicians.

free zines: issuu.com/ggbzine

genderedintelligence:

[Flyer reads: LGBTQIA Feminist Collage Activism Workshop. A free two day event for seventeen to twenty one year olds. Young artists and activists collaborate to disrupt media representations of gender. Use a combination of traditional and digital collage, gif art, and tee shirt printing to articulate and share your opinions to promote individual creative and gender expression. With help from curator of Girls Get Busy zine Beth Siveyer and photographer Hannah Nagle.

Location: Eastside Educational Trust, Perseverance Works, Suite 16, 37 Hackney Road, E2 7NX
Dates: Wednesday 6th and Thursday 7th August. 11 AM to 4:30 PM. You must be available for both days.
Only 10 places available. To sign up, email himarni@live.co.uk with your name, age, mobile number and why you want to take part.]

genderedintelligence:

[Flyer reads: LGBTQIA Feminist Collage Activism Workshop. A free two day event for seventeen to twenty one year olds. Young artists and activists collaborate to disrupt media representations of gender. Use a combination of traditional and digital collage, gif art, and tee shirt printing to articulate and share your opinions to promote individual creative and gender expression. With help from curator of Girls Get Busy zine Beth Siveyer and photographer Hannah Nagle.

Location: Eastside Educational Trust, Perseverance Works, Suite 16, 37 Hackney Road, E2 7NX

Dates: Wednesday 6th and Thursday 7th August. 11 AM to 4:30 PM. You must be available for both days.

Only 10 places available. To sign up, email himarni@live.co.uk with your name, age, mobile number and why you want to take part.]

skinnygirldietband:

by Luca Giorietto

Skinny Girl Diet

skinnygirldietband:

by Luca Giorietto

Skinny Girl Diet

promiscuous-petal:

enough about sex positions has anyone discovered a reading position which doesn’t get uncomfortable after 5 minutes

mashallah-project:

a few hairs by d. marvi
my relationship with my unibrow is tempestuous. some days i hide it away, plucking out each hair with hatred. others, i smooth it down lovingly with rosewater and feed it coconut oil at night to hasten it’s growth. these hairs are one of the many ways i’m navigating my own body while i navigate the liminal space of diaspora. my unibrow evokes both the racial privileged of the homeland and and the racial alienation of the hostland. painting my unibrow gold can be seen as an act of beautification and self-acceptance. conversely, it can be seen as self-orientalization, or, making a prominent physical sign of my racial “otherness” even more so. or, simply, it could be an innocent whimsy. i choose to keep the meaning of this as ambiguous as possible, to mimic my own fluid, love-hate relationship with my unibrow.

mashallah-project:

a few hairs by d. marvi

my relationship with my unibrow is tempestuous. some days i hide it away, plucking out each hair with hatred. others, i smooth it down lovingly with rosewater and feed it coconut oil at night to hasten it’s growth. these hairs are one of the many ways i’m navigating my own body while i navigate the liminal space of diaspora. my unibrow evokes both the racial privileged of the homeland and and the racial alienation of the hostland. painting my unibrow gold can be seen as an act of beautification and self-acceptance. conversely, it can be seen as self-orientalization, or, making a prominent physical sign of my racial “otherness” even more so. or, simply, it could be an innocent whimsy. i choose to keep the meaning of this as ambiguous as possible, to mimic my own fluid, love-hate relationship with my unibrow.

(via immigrantgirls)

How to respond to nude pic requests from boys

How to respond to nude pic requests from boys

(Source: klainalsex, via feministsuperpowers)

hannahregel:

SALT. invites you to attend the launch of their sixth issue: Manifesto, on the 6th August at The White Building.In a climate where traditional modes of articulating refusal through physical action become criminalised or dangerous, language, and furthermore what can be done with it, becomes the only potent weapon left. Errors in our communications offer space for disruption and subsequently open up new ways to disobey through glossolalia: to speak in tongues, to be incomprehensible, and to confuse. This issue attempts to put into circulation performative gestures of disobedience and nonquiescent articulation as models for experimental protest. Come and listen to readings from the publication from 7pm!Contributors:Adrienne Arcilla, Mali Collins, Giulia Damiani, Molly Davey, Freya Field - Donovan, Jack Halberstam, Aimee Heinemann, Eve Lacey, Kay Law, Hannah Regel, Thea Smith, Vicki Tingle, Giulia Tommasi, Villa Design Group, Jala WahidSALT. would like to thank Montez Press and The White Building for their support.
Unit 7, Queen’s Yard, White Post Lane, E9 5EN London

hannahregel:

SALT. invites you to attend the launch of their sixth issue: Manifesto, on the 6th August at The White Building.

In a climate where traditional modes of articulating refusal through physical action become criminalised or dangerous, language, and furthermore what can be done with it, becomes the only potent weapon left. Errors in our communications offer space for disruption and subsequently open up new ways to disobey through glossolalia: to speak in tongues, to be incomprehensible, and to confuse. This issue attempts to put into circulation performative gestures of disobedience and nonquiescent articulation as models for experimental protest. 

Come and listen to readings from the publication from 7pm!

Contributors:
Adrienne Arcilla, Mali Collins, Giulia Damiani, Molly Davey, Freya Field - Donovan, Jack Halberstam, Aimee Heinemann, Eve Lacey, Kay Law, Hannah Regel, Thea Smith, Vicki Tingle, Giulia Tommasi, Villa Design Group, Jala Wahid

SALT. would like to thank Montez Press and The White Building for their support.

Unit 7, Queen’s Yard, White Post Lane, E9 5EN London

(via tenderblog)

kalisherni:

Gulabi Maps:: Dari दरी :: Hand woven textiles for each sister in my mother’s family 

My mama’s mom got daris/textile mattress-blankets made for her 5 daughters for their dowries in punjab…
My mama’s is this pink geometric textile that traveled with her to the US and was packed away for years in the garage closet filled with other indian suits/saris/cloths. 
Found it a year ago and brought it to my home away frm home, where it lays unfolded on my bed or wrapped around me :) 
this textile carries the energies of strong mamas & migration…. oooff
& the designs are so beautiphool 

(via immigrantgirls)


Discrimination Pong is a two-player game by Anna Anthropy about privilege and the myth that everyone is equally capable of succeeding in a capitalist society. It’s unsurprisingly an asymmetrical game: like pong, the players use rectangular “paddles” to try and return a bouncing square ball. But while the right player, who not coincidentally plays the white paddle, enjoys consistent playing conditions, the left player is subjected to a series of handicaps: slowed down, shortened, or straight-up made immaterial. At the end of the game, the left player is told to “work harder,” a message which disregards the obvious ways the odds have been rigged against that player.

Discrimination Pong is a two-player game by Anna Anthropy about privilege and the myth that everyone is equally capable of succeeding in a capitalist society. It’s unsurprisingly an asymmetrical game: like pong, the players use rectangular “paddles” to try and return a bouncing square ball. But while the right player, who not coincidentally plays the white paddle, enjoys consistent playing conditions, the left player is subjected to a series of handicaps: slowed down, shortened, or straight-up made immaterial. At the end of the game, the left player is told to “work harder,” a message which disregards the obvious ways the odds have been rigged against that player.

(via benthicbeauty)

womanhouse:

Cole Chickering, Model Behavior #1, (2014)

a printed collection via womans-day 

What counts as activism? Why didn’t the kind of emotional self-care me and my girls were doing—talking to each other about all the fucked-up shit we were going through as brown girls—count? Why didn’t my best friend driving her elderly East African mother to the doctor and renegotiating her way through the layers of the racist, sexist, condescending bullshit medical system count as activism? Did staying alive count as activism? Did re-learning Tamil, one of my Sri Lankan family’s languages, count? Did cooking good Sri Lankan food and learning how to cook those recipes I didn’t have female family members around to teach me count? As a South Asian femme immigrant who was having a shitty week, did shopping at the MAC counter and finding the perfect shade of fuchsia lip gloss for my milk-tea skin count?

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, “A Time to Hole Up And a Time to Kick Ass” in We Don’t Need Another Wave (via seashells4teeth)

(Source: irresistible-revolution, via seashells4teeth)